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New Member

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10 Messages

Tue, Sep 8, 2020 2:08 PM

How can I get fee based internet support?

I recently ordered a static IP address and all I have is the address itself. I need to know the subnet mask and gateway address too. I would like to know if I can put my equipment on the other side of a router as well and how I would setup the subnet for that.

 

I can't even speak to a person at the 800.288.2020 number. They say my equipment is working fine and due to heavy call volume and covid I need to use the online tools.  The online info on static IP says to call AT&T. So you can see the problem...

 

I would pay somebody and see some stuff on the att site about fee based support but I don't know how to get it?

 

Thanks in advance for any suggestions!

Accepted Solution

Official Solution

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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29.3K Messages

2年前

The paid technical support is (a) pretty much worthless and (b) called ConnecTech.  If you're determined to go that route... click on the Contact Us link at the bottom of the page, then click on AT&T Internet (under Internet), and scroll down to Other Contact Options.  Right now it shows me:  866.294.3464   Every day, 8 a.m. - 11 p.m. ET

 

However, let's see if we can help you avoid that mess:

 

You get a /29 block of 8 addresses of which 5 are usable.  They should have given you the base address of the block (the last octet should be evenly divisible by 8).  The next address up is nominally the router address, then the next 5 are yours to do with as you please, and the final one is the broadcast address for the block.  Your subnet mask within a /29 block is always 255.255.255.248 (i.e. all bits set except the last 3, representing the bits in your 8 address range).

 

You have three ways of setting up your network for this:

  1. Setting your public static address devices up with their address
  2. Setting your Gateway up to give out public addresses (not recommended by me)
  3. Configuring a router behind your Gateway to handle the public subnet.

Which of these do you think you want to do?

And what model Gateway do you have?

 

(edited)

my thoughts

Employee

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19.3K Messages

2年前

https://www.att.com/support/smallbusiness/article/smb-internet/KM1181996/

New Member

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10 Messages

2年前

Many thanks for your help JefferMC!  I like where you're going but not sure about everything yet. Here's some more info on my setup you asked about...thanks for your reply!

 

My block of IPs x.y.z.233 - 237 (this is what the AT&T sales rep told me hiding some detail of course and I don't know how I'd know otherwise?)

My AT&T modem/router is a Pace 5268AC 

 

My immediate goal is to make this work with a direct connection to the above AT&T router. Later I want to put my own router between my static-IP server and the AT&T modem.

 

The modem is configured with a special pass-thru mode for this one host where it forwards all ports without firewall rules setup for them - doubt that matters but it might? I do know that right now my server actually gets the same IP as the AT&T router when that is turned on. I think that's the only way it can get this non-static address exposed on the internet.

 

On my equipment where I'm setting the static IP (a synology DS-918+) I currently have it getting a dynamic IP from the AT&T modem.  To change it to a static IP I need to answer each of these prompts:

 

IP Address: 

Subnet Mask:

Gateway:

DNS Server:

 

Man if you told me what the answers should be! Thank you! I've got everything working once I get my IP to settle down :-)

New Member

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10 Messages

2年前

This is what I've pieced together...I still don't know what DNS my host should use? It was getting that thru dhcp but now I have a static address.

 

I'm hoping this is right based on the 233-237 info the sales rep told me vs. what's divisible by 8 (my ??.?? is to avoid listing the whole address).

 

Does this look right??

 

Block 45.??.??.230 - 237

Base.....: 45.??.??.230

Gateway: 45.??.??.231

IP1........: 45.??.??.232

IP2........: 45.??.??.233

IP3........: 45.??.??.234

IP4........: 45.??.??.235

IP5........: 45.??.??.236

Broadcast: 45.??.??.237

Subnet mask: 255.255.255.248

my thoughts

Employee

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19.3K Messages

2年前

This is the network base address is not usable as a host address.

  •  144.157.80.0

Usable host address: 

  • 144.157.80.1
  • 144.157.80.2
  • 144.157.80.3
  • 144.157.80.4
  • 144.157.80.5

This is the last usable address. Assign this address to the gateway/RG. 

  • 144.157.80.6

This is the broadcast address and not usable as a host address. 

  • 144.157.80.7

Note: In all Static IP block options, always assign the first and last IP address as the network base address and the broadcast address. Always assign the second to the last as the gateway/RG. The customer cannot assign these three IP addresses to any of their local devices. However, any IP address between the first, second to the last, and the last IP addresses are eligible to assign to local devices.

New Member

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10 Messages

2年前

Hey thanks for the info in particular I didn't know the gateway was last at .6.  I had it set like 144.157.80.0.  It seemed to actually work. I can get out on the internet such as downloading index.html from cnn.com. But I can do that when I'm set to on the .0 address too. I'm not sure I know how to be sure the gateway address works? I would have thought that if it's wrong you could not get past the router and out on the internet?

 

I also wonder about the subnet mask. I poster said use 255.255.255.0.  But seems like .248 is what it should be, with the lower 3 clear at 11111000.

JefferMC

ACE - Expert

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29.3K Messages

2年前

Sorry, yeah, my thoughts is correct, AT&T likes to reserve the LAST IP in the block for the gateway, not the first (note the Gateway's own LAN IP is .254).  This makes the 5 addresses they gave you line up correctly.

 

The subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 will work just as well as 255.255.255.248 as long as you don't ever try to access a host with an address in the same class C (e.g. 144.x.x.3 or 144.x.x.246).  With the .0 mask it will assume it is local, not try to route, and not get to it.  With the .248 mask it will properly assume it is not local, and route it out of your network.

 

Your experiments may be using the dynamic public address and NAT, rather than your dedicated static public subnet.  You do still have that for all your nodes that aren't intended to be on the public static subnet.

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