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dorlow's profile
dorlow
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The 5th element!

Contributor

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40 Messages

Friday, October 28th, 2022 1:30 PM

How can I extend my fiber in my house?

Ok, we're scheduled to have fiber internet installed to our house by the end of the year.  (Currently 4g is my only option.  Also, it won't be at&t... our local electric company is providing it.  but I figure an at&t forum will have a bigger audience to look at this and might know.)  I'm trying to figure out the home network.  I have a pretty nice setup.  My home internet "router" solution is a little more advanced than the average home user.  Have a watchguard firewall that acts as my router hooked to a cisco 2960 switch that goes to a whole bunch of cisco access points around the house that all work on 802.11ax which can handle a gigabit.

But, the question I have is, when they install fiber, they're almost certainly going to install it to the front of the house.  I can't see me convincing them to run it around to the back of the house.  I currently have our networking equipment in our bedroom that's on the back side of the house.  I am going to mount my 2960 switch in a small form factor network cabinet.  It'll look like an average IDF in a buisness.  

The front of our house is, for the most part, our dining room.  I don't think my wife will be crazy about me putting a server rack in the dining room.  So, I was thinking I should do like an extended demarc kind of thing.  I was seeing on amazon, I could buy an SPF to RJ45 converter.

https://a.co/d/7hx9aNL

But, to make this work, I need a transceiver that I can put in that converter that can hook to the single fiber line that cable uses.  All of the transceivers I used in a previous life (job) we had the transceivers where there are two fiber lines for each one... one for sending and one for receiving.  The cable company sends and receives on the same fiber line.  I'm sure the fiber is multimode.  So, I'd need a transceiver that works with the multimode fiber that the average home internet fiber uses.  Does anyone know where to get that?

markbnj

New Member

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75 Messages

3 months ago

have you (sorry if it was obvious) tried talking to some of the techs at the electric

company?  they might know.

Baring that, suggest maybe calling the new customer line at power company, offer to pay for an extension to the line, and suggest they call the local supervisor  or engineer at the local office to get you a price quote.

You could also see if you can find a  local tech hanging out at his truck, and try and get his dispatcher's # (or even offer him a weekend job, to extend the cable for you)

do they have a customer board like this one?

and regarding the 802AX.  we just normally call it wifi6. 

hope something touche a nerve and helps

And I hope all of your cisco AP's are hardwired, and go back to your central hub.

dorlow

Contributor

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40 Messages

3 months ago

I have two access points and both are hard wired.   I also have quite a few range extenders that are designed to work with the access points that are not hard wired.  They're creating a wireless mesh in the house.  I have 5 of them scattered around to get coverage everywhere.

dorlow

Contributor

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40 Messages

3 months ago

I'm sure their price quite is going to be way more than we'll want to spend.  It will be way cheaper if I do it myself.

dorlow

Contributor

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40 Messages

3 months ago

I guess, the more I think about it, at the very least, I could just have them run the fiber outside the house to maybe a service box or just have them leave it there for me to finish it.  I could then hook it to the converter and then just run the cat5 myself.  

One access point is in my house and one is in the garage.  Both are hard wired.  But, I currently have the cat5 to the garage just lying on top of the ground since I don't know what my plans are once fiber is installed.  Once fiber is installed, my plan is to trench it and make it perminant.

markbnj

New Member

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75 Messages

3 months ago

That works too.

Especially if you can make friends with the dispatcher/tech, etc and hire them privately to  'consult' with you on a weekend. (they won't touch equipment, just guide you and make sure you have right equipment/etc)

dorlow

Contributor

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40 Messages

3 months ago

Just got to thinking.... need to scratch that whole idea.  Missing one very important step.  I can't just run fiber to a converter to twisted pair cat 6 and plug that into a switch.  It needs to plug into whatever modem they're going to provide me, which will be almost guaranteed a fiber modem.  (Years ago, they ran fiber to the pole and then twisted pair to the house... but our last house, it was fiber to the modem.  I'm sure that's how they'll do it too.)

So, if I converted it from fiber to twisted pair, I now can't plug it into the modem... none of it works.

So, I guess I'll have to have them just install the modem at the front of the house and I'll have to figure out how to fish a wire from the dining room to our bedroom.

dorlow

Contributor

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40 Messages

3 months ago

Unless they'd at least run it to the back of the house on top of the ground and I bury it... maybe that'll work

markbnj

New Member

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75 Messages

3 months ago

having them run to back of house IS best idea!  do you want them to put it in a sleeve before it goes on the ground?

dorlow

Contributor

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40 Messages

3 months ago

More I think about it, I doubt they'll just leave it above the ground and let me bury it.  Then there's no demarcation point where if something goes wrong, I can point my finger at the internet company or they can point their finger at me saying it's my issue.  If I finish the install, they're not going to warranty the work up to the modem.  

So, maybe I would have to create a demarc somewhere outside my house on the front where they're responsible to it and I'm responsible after it.  But, then too, this is probably too unique of a situation for the average user and they probably won't want the headaches of having a unique install.

markbnj

New Member

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75 Messages

3 months ago

The idea of an outdoor demarc is excellent, and they should go in on it (I bet)

they might ask you to provide the weatherproof box for it (make sure it can take a combination padlock!)

having done my personal stint as a last mile installer, having a demarc is essential to ensure you point fingers the right way (as opposed to the wrong way!)

cheers

if you can find out what kind of fiber terminations they use, you could even pre-populate (and position/install the box), then they can't complain its a unique non-supportable install!

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